Common ground: ASFASA festival 

By Russ Cooper

<em>What is left</em> by GaŽlle Lalonde: Identity, gender and sexuality exhibit. Magnifying glass

What is left by GaŽlle Lalonde: Identity, gender and sexuality exhibit.

ASFA and FASA have teamed up for a unique partnership in the inaugural annual ASFASA festival. Taking place until Feb. 20, the festival is a series of speakers, exhibitions and conferences exploring the common ground between arts and science and fine arts.

The festival's main organizer Marie Borcheix-Laporte says the collaboration between the organizations was a natural one since fine arts and arts and science often influence each other.

"We thought it would be interesting to create an exchange between the faculties. The festival will be a nice springboard for dialogue," says Borcheix-Laporte.

<em>Toiles du jour: Toile 1</em> by Alia Love: Part of the cultural identity and post-colonialism exhibit. Magnifying glass

Toiles du jour: Toile 1 by Alia Love: Part of the cultural identity and post-colonialism exhibit.

The initiative is targeting three departments to display artistic and academic work on three related themes. The theme identity, gender and sexuality is displayed within the Simone de Beauvoir Institute; the Geography Department will host the environmental issues and sustainability theme; and post-colonialism and multiculturalism will be running with Anthropology and Sociology. As well, ASFA organized three symposia for students to present papers and share their knowledge on these issues.

As early as the end of March, a publication will be produced featuring essays by arts and science students, artist statements and photographs of the works showcased in the exhibits.

<em>Night</em> by Matthew Hood: Part of the environmental and sustainability issues exhibit. Magnifying glass

Night by Matthew Hood: Part of the environmental and sustainability issues exhibit.

Borcheix-Laporte, a fine arts major in studio art and VP external on FASA, says the festival's organizers were extremely pleased with the number of submissions (nearly 80) they received for the festivalís first edition. She says the decision to display the chosen works in their departmental settings rather than a gallery was a conscious one.

"We really wanted to go into places frequented by students," she says. "It was meant to produce these encounters and a chance to see the artwork without going into an unfamiliar space."

Magnifying glass

The identity, gender and sexuality exhibit Let's Come Together! is being held at 2170 Bishop; the environmental issues and sustainability exhibit Whereabouts is being held on the Hall Building's 12th floor. Both of the symposia connected with those exhibits have already been held. The cultural identity and post-colonialism exhibit Invaded is being held on the Hall Building's 11th floor and H 1132, with a vernissage and conference on Feb. 16 at 6 p.m. in EV 1.605.

 

Concordia University